User:Paul R. Marchesano

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General Information

Contributor since: 2003-04-08

Works with editions by this editor: 160 (see list)

Unique works (some multiple movement works, 14 of which are complete Mass settings)

Contact Information

E-mail: paul.marchesano@gmail.com or paul@marchesano.org

Background

Born: 1963, New York, NY
Professional tenor and organist in Philadelphia, PA. Tenor section leader for the premier professional ensemble VoxAmaDeus in the Philadelphia area, free-lance professional tenor and former occasional member of the semi-professional 20-voice ensemble, Ancient Voices, at the University of Pennsylvania.
I also am a pipe organ restorer, maintaining a small number of organs in the Philadelphia area, and consulting nationally.

My Editions

I produce distinctly modern editions of mostly Renaissance works for performance by ensembles today. It is my intention that these works can easily be performed by concert or church choirs of varying degrees of experience. In order to make my editions accessible, I generally choose to halve note values and set key signatures that will be compatible with most performers. Unless the original pitch and voicing sits at an uncomfortable range for most modern ensembles, I publish at original pitch. Please contact me if you need to have an edition transposed and are unable to do so! Inquiries and requests are welcome.



In addition to the free contributions above, I have prepared the first (to my knowledge) modern edition of Six Solo Cantatas for solo voice (soprano, tenor) and instrumental ensembles (strings, continuo plus additional instruments) by Thomas Arne, published in 1755. Full score plus realized continuo part, instrumental parts, as well as wav or mp3 files of synth. voice will be included.


I have prepared an edition of Tommaso Bai's Miserere (the other Miserere setting for the Sistine Chapel. It is transcribed from the 1840 publication and to my knowledge is the only modern edition in existence. Similarly in the style antico like Allegri's famous setting, it was composed with the intention of applying the famous "abellimenti" as sung with the Allegri setting. I have not inserted the presumed chant stylings of the 18th century Cappella Sistina, but have chosen more commonly known modes.


Because of the scope of these projects, I will publish these for a small fee. Enquiries are welcome.

List of translations