Difference between revisions of "Night song (Peter Bird)"

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(Composer added new work, "Night song" and its text.)
 
({{Text|English, corrections)
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{{Legend}}
 
{{Legend}}
  
*{{NewWork|2013-05-18}} {{CPDLno|29168}} [{{filepath:Bird-Night_song.pdf}} {{pdf}}] [{{filepath:Bird-Night_song.mid}} {{mid}}] [{{filepath:Bird-Night_song.sib}} Sibelius 5] [{{filepath:null}} {{mp3}}]
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*{{NewWork|2013-05-18}} {{CPDLno|29168}} [{{filepath:Bird-Night_song.pdf}} {{pdf}}] [{{filepath:Bird-Night_song.mid}} {{mid}}] [{{filepath:Bird-Night_song.sib}} Sibelius 5]
 
{{Editor|Peter Bird|2013-05-18}}{{ScoreInfo|Letter|9|100}}{{Copy|Creative Commons Attribution Share Alike}}
 
{{Editor|Peter Bird|2013-05-18}}{{ScoreInfo|Letter|9|100}}{{Copy|Creative Commons Attribution Share Alike}}
 
:'''Edition notes:''' Text, and some explanation of text, on last page of the PDF.
 
:'''Edition notes:''' Text, and some explanation of text, on last page of the PDF.
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'''Published:''' 2013
 
'''Published:''' 2013
  
'''Description:''' This style of this song is inspired by both Native American and African choral traditions.
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'''Description:''' This style of this song is inspired by both Native American and African choral traditions. The Paiute place-names in the text fix it in the lonely lands north of the Grand Canyon: the High Plateaus around the Arizona-Utah border. (Paunsagunt, Kaibab, & Kaiparowits are the great plateaus which frame the country; Kanab & Nankoweap are two permanent creeks which supported small Indian villages.) This song expresses the joy of togetherness on a starry night with gentle breezes in the pines and perhaps a far-off sound of running water.<br>
The Paiute place-names in the text fix it in the lonely lands north of the Grand Canyon:
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This is a shingled part-song consisting of repeated 4-bar phrases of 5/4. The diatonic pitches are easy to read, and the only challenge is to count correctly until this meter becomes natural. As each voice part has only 4 or 5 distinct phrases (totalling 16 or 20 distinct bars), it is not hard to memorize. It could serve well as a concert-closer (or encore number) in an evening concert.  Length: 3:45
the High Plateaus around the Arizona-Utah border.
 
(Paunsagunt, Kaibab, & Kaiparowits are the great plateaus which frame the country;
 
Kanab & Nankoweap are two permanent creeks which supported small Indian villages.)
 
This song expresses the joy of togetherness on a starry night with gentle breezes  
 
in the pines and perhaps a far-off sound of running water.<br>
 
This is a shingled part-song consisting of repeated 4-bar phrases of 5/4.
 
The diatonic pitches are easy to read, and the only challenge is to
 
count correctly until this meter becomes natural.
 
As each voice part has only 4 or 5 distinct phrases
 
(totalling 16 or 20 distinct bars), it is not hard to memorize.
 
It could serve well as a concert-closer (or encore number) in an evening concert.  Length: 3:45
 
  
 
'''External websites:''' http://peterbird.name/choral/
 
'''External websites:''' http://peterbird.name/choral/
  
 
==Original text and translations==
 
==Original text and translations==
NIGHT  SONG<br>
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<br>
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{{Text|English|
Paunsagunt, Kaibab, and Kaiparowits<br>
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Paunsagunt, Kaibab, and Kaiparowits
walk under the stars.<br>
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walk under the stars.
<br>
+
 
Pinyon, ponderosa, and bristlecone<br>
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Pinyon, ponderosa, and bristlecone
whisper the wind.<br>
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whisper the wind.
<br>
+
 
Kanab and Nankoweap<br>
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Kanab and Nankoweap
flow on through the night.<br>
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flow on through the night.
<br>
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Shinumo.  Tokawana.  Shinumo.<br>
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Shinumo.  Tokawana.  Shinumo.
<br>
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Star.<br>
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Star.
<br>
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}}
  
 
[[Category:Sheet music]]
 
[[Category:Sheet music]]
 
[[Category:Modern music]]
 
[[Category:Modern music]]

Revision as of 04:31, 29 May 2013

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Editor: Peter Bird (submitted 2013-05-18).   Score information: Letter, 9 pages, 100 kB   Copyright: CC BY SA
Edition notes: Text, and some explanation of text, on last page of the PDF.

General Information

Title: Night song
Composer: Peter Bird

Number of voices: 4vv   Voicing: SATB
Genre: SecularEvening Canticles

Language: English
Instruments: Accompanied by one drum.
Published: 2013

Description: This style of this song is inspired by both Native American and African choral traditions. The Paiute place-names in the text fix it in the lonely lands north of the Grand Canyon: the High Plateaus around the Arizona-Utah border. (Paunsagunt, Kaibab, & Kaiparowits are the great plateaus which frame the country; Kanab & Nankoweap are two permanent creeks which supported small Indian villages.) This song expresses the joy of togetherness on a starry night with gentle breezes in the pines and perhaps a far-off sound of running water.
This is a shingled part-song consisting of repeated 4-bar phrases of 5/4. The diatonic pitches are easy to read, and the only challenge is to count correctly until this meter becomes natural. As each voice part has only 4 or 5 distinct phrases (totalling 16 or 20 distinct bars), it is not hard to memorize. It could serve well as a concert-closer (or encore number) in an evening concert. Length: 3:45

External websites: http://peterbird.name/choral/

Original text and translations

English.png English text

Paunsagunt, Kaibab, and Kaiparowits
walk under the stars.

Pinyon, ponderosa, and bristlecone
whisper the wind.

Kanab and Nankoweap
flow on through the night.

Shinumo. Tokawana. Shinumo.

Star.