Difference between revisions of "Ernest Walker"

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==Life==
 
==Life==
 
'''Born:''' 15 July 1870, Bombay, India
 
'''Born:''' 15 July 1870, Bombay, India
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* ''Ode to a Nightingale'' for baritone solo, clarinet solo, mixed chorus and orchestra, Op. 14 (1908); words by John Keats
 
* ''Ode to a Nightingale'' for baritone solo, clarinet solo, mixed chorus and orchestra, Op. 14 (1908); words by John Keats
 
* ''2 Anthems'' for male voices and organ, Op. 16 (1899)
 
* ''2 Anthems'' for male voices and organ, Op. 16 (1899)
:#    I Will Lift Up Mine Eyes (also for female voices and organ)
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:#    [[I will lift up mine eyes (Ernest Walker)|I will lift up mine eyes]] (also for female voices and organ)
:#    Lord, Thou Hast Been Our Refuge (also for mixed voices and organ)
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:#    [[Lord, Thou hast been our refuge (Ernest Walker)|Lord, Thou hast been our refuge]] (also for mixed voices and organ)
 
* ''6 Three-part Songs'' for 3 female voices and piano, Op. 17 (1901–1908)
 
* ''6 Three-part Songs'' for 3 female voices and piano, Op. 17 (1901–1908)
 
* ''The Splendour Falls on Castle Walls'' for mixed chorus a cappella, Op. 24 (1906); words by Alfred, Lord Tennyson
 
* ''The Splendour Falls on Castle Walls'' for mixed chorus a cappella, Op. 24 (1906); words by Alfred, Lord Tennyson
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==Publications==
 
==Publications==
  
 
==External links==
 
==External links==
*{{IMSLP|id=Walker, Ernest|cname= Ernest Walker}}
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* {{IMSLP|id=Walker, Ernest|cname= Ernest Walker}}
*[https://britishmusiccollection.org.uk/composer/ernest-walker]
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* https://britishmusiccollection.org.uk/composer/ernest-walker
  
 
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[[Category:1870 births]]
 
[[Category:1870 births]]
 
[[Category:1949 deaths]]
 
[[Category:1949 deaths]]
[[Category:Composers (unhosted)]]
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[[Category:Composers]]
 
[[Category:Modern composers]]
 
[[Category:Modern composers]]
 
[[Category:English composers]]
 
[[Category:English composers]]

Latest revision as of 20:02, 9 January 2020

Life

Born: 15 July 1870, Bombay, India

Died: 21 February 1949

Biography

Ernest Walker was born in Bombay, India, on 15 July 1870, and died in Oxford on 21 February 1949. At an early age his family returned to England, where he eventually studied the piano with Ernst Pauer and harmony with Alfred Richter (a son of the cantor at St Thomas's Church, Leipzig) before going up to Oxford to study music, receiving his Doctorate of Music in 1898.

He held a number of posts at Balliol College (Assistant organist 1891 - 1901, organist and director of music from 1901, resigning as organist in 1913, and director of music in 1925). He was also, for many years, an examiner and member of the Board of Studies for music, and was instrumental in improving the standard of B.Mus and D.Mus degrees.

In his work as an accompanist and organiser of chamber concerts he worked with many distinguished artists of the time, and staged premieres works of notable contemporary composers.

He also edited and wrote articles for periodicals, newspapers, and reference books, in addition to books of his own work. His style was distinctive: “stand-offish, wildly unjust and unforgiving, Walker's assertions are so sweeping and extravagant that it would be a waste of space to discuss them. To put it bluntly, he was an eccentric, continually inconsistent, and often irresponsible”

(derived from the Wikipedia article)


View the Wikipedia article on Ernest Walker.

List of choral works

Vocal
  • Brown Is My Love, Madrigal for 5 voices (1893)
  • From the Upland and the Sea for baritone, 2 violins, viola, cello and piano (1894); words by William Morris
  • A Message for voice and piano (1894); words by G. H. F. Cookson
  • Le Tsigane dans la lune for voice and piano (1894); words by Jean Lahor
  • Why So Pale and Wan? for voice and piano (1895); words by John Suckling
  • 6 Songs for medium voice and piano, Op. 1; words by William Shakespeare and Ludwig Uhland
  • 3 Songs for voice and piano (1898); words by Olga von Gerstfeldt
  • 6 Two-part Songs for 2 female voices and piano, Op. 2 (published 1898); words by Robert Herrick, William Shakespeare and Percy Bysshe Shelley
  • 6 Songs for voice and piano, Op. 3 (1893); words by William Shakespeare, Robert Burns, Alfred, Lord Tennyson, Heinrich Heine and Karl Candidus
  • 6 Two-part Songs for 2 female voices and piano, Op. 7 (1897); words from Songs of Innocence and of Experience by William Blake
  • The Wind on the Wold for high voice and piano (1902); words by William Ernest Henley
  • Three War Songs for voice and piano (1902); words from The Princess by Alfred, Lord Tennyson
  • 2 Duets for soprano, baritone and piano (1902); words by Robert Herrick and from an Elizabethan songbook
  • 6 Songs for low voice and piano, Op. 12; words by Christina Rossetti, Olga von Gerstfeldt, Alfred, Lord Tennyson, Robert Herrick and Thomas Moore
  • I Care Not for the Idle State, Anacreontic Ode for baritone and piano, Op. 15; words by Thomas Moore
  • Corinna's Going A-Maying for voice and piano, Op. 18 (1902); words by Robert Herrick
  • Camilla Fair for voice and piano (1903); words from an Elizabethan song-book
  • 2 Songs for voice and piano, Op. 19 (1903); words by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow and Charles Kingsley
  • Duets for alto and tenor (1904); words by Heinrich Heine
  • Bluebells from the Clearings for voice and piano, Op. 21 (1906); words by William Ernest Henley
  • 3 Songs for voice and piano, Op. 27 (1909); words from an Elizabethan manuscript and by Sydney Thompson Dobell
  • To Althea for voice and piano (1909); words by Richard Lovelace
  • Come into the Garden, Maud for voice and piano, Op. 28 (1911); words by Alfred, Lord Tennyson
  • 5 Songs for voices and piano, Op. 36 (1924); words by Robert Greene, Ben Jonson, Thomas Ravenscroft, Beaumont and Fletcher, Mary Scott
  • Songs with Small Orchestra for high voice and small orchestra (or piano), Op. 38 (1926); words by Sydney Thompson Dobell
  • Ring Out, Wild Bells, Canon for two equal voices and piano, Op. 64 (1937); words by Alfred, Lord Tennyson
Choral
  • Psalm 130 "De Profundis" for soloists, chorus and orchestra (1892)
  • Stabat Mater for 4 solo voices, mixed chorus and orchestra (1897)
  • 5 Songs for 4 voices and piano, Op. 10 (1900); words from Englands Helicon (1600)
  • A Hymn to Dionysus for mixed chorus and orchestra, Op. 13 (1906); words by Euripides
  • Ode to a Nightingale for baritone solo, clarinet solo, mixed chorus and orchestra, Op. 14 (1908); words by John Keats
  • 2 Anthems for male voices and organ, Op. 16 (1899)
  1. I will lift up mine eyes (also for female voices and organ)
  2. Lord, Thou hast been our refuge (also for mixed voices and organ)
  • 6 Three-part Songs for 3 female voices and piano, Op. 17 (1901–1908)
  • The Splendour Falls on Castle Walls for mixed chorus a cappella, Op. 24 (1906); words by Alfred, Lord Tennyson
  • The World's Wanderers, Part-Song for 3 female voices and piano, Op. 25 (1906); words by Percy Bysshe Shelley
  • Liberty, Part-Song for 4 male voices a cappella, Op. 26 (1906); words by Percy Bysshe Shelley
  • Neptune's Empire, Choral Lyric for chorus and orchestra (1910); words by Thomas Campion
  • 3 Part-Songs for 3 female voices a cappella, Op. 30 (1912, 1914); words by Robert Herrick
  • In Pride of May, Part-Song for 3 female voices and piano, Op. 31 (1914); words from an Elizabethan songbook
  • Orpheus with His Lute, Part-Song for mixed voices a cappella, Op. 33 (1922); words by William Shakespeare
  • Full Fathom Five, Song for 6 soprano voices a cappella, Op. 34 (1923); words by William Shakespeare
  • Soft Music, Part-Song for mixed chorus a cappella, Op. 48 (1931); words by Robert Herrick
  • The Lady Margaret Hall Hymn-Tunes for chorus a cappella, Op. 51 (1932); also for organ
  • The Earth Is the Lord's, Motet for female chorus a cappella, Op. 52 (1932)
  • Sunset and Evening Star, Choral Song for mixed chorus a cappella, Op. 55 (1932); published 1934; words by Alfred, Lord Tennyson
  • One Generation Passeth Away, Motet for mixed chorus a cappella, Op. 56 (1934); Biblical words from Ecclesiastes
  • Hearken to Me, Ye That Follow after Righteousness, Motet for female chorus a cappella, piano or organ ad libitum, Op. 58 (1934); Biblical words from the Book of Isaiah
  • Magnificat and Nunc Dimittis in D major for female voices and organ, Op. 62 (1935)
  • Song from Schiller's "Wilhelm Tell" for voice and piano (1937); words by Friedrich Schiller
  • Dirge in Woods for mixed chorus a cappella, Op. 65 (1939); words by George Meredith


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Publications

External links