Ecclesiarum mores (Anonymous)

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  • (Posted 2016-03-13)   CPDL #38870:      (XML)
Editor: Renato Calcaterra (submitted 2016-03-13).   Score information: A4, 2 pages, 56 kB   Copyright: CPDL
Edition notes: The brevis in the Contra voice marked with an asterisk above, fills a missing measure.
  • CPDL #21392:      (XML)
Editor: Renato Calcaterra (submitted 2010-04-08).   Score information: A4, 4 pages, 129 kB   Copyright: CPDL
Edition notes: Original note values. MusicXML file is zipped.
Error.gif Possible error(s) identified. Error summary: No text underlay

General Information

Title: Ecclesiarum mores
Composer: Anonymous

Number of voices: 3vv   Voicing: STB
Genre: SacredSequence hymn for several feasts noted below

Language: Latin
Instruments: A cappella

First published: post 1445 in Trent ms88, copied c.1472-1477

Description:

External websites:

Original text and translations

Fragments of the sequence 'Clare sanctorum', which was set at greater length by Isaac and Lassus, and was intended for the feast of St Thomas, the Commemoration of St Paul, and the Common of Several Apostles.

Latin.png Latin text

Ecclesiarum mores et vitam moderare.
Antiochus et Remus concedunt tibi Petre regni solium.
Ethiopes horridos Matthae agnelli vellere.
Thoma Bartholomae Ioannes Philippe Simon Iacobique pariles.
En vos oriens et occidens immo teres mundi circulus habere se patres gaudet
et expectat iudices

English.png English translation

To order the conduct and life of the churches,
Antiochus and Remus concede to you, Peter, the throne of the kingdom.
Fearsome Ethiopians have Matthew in the fleece of a lamb.
Equals of Thomas, Bartholomew, John, Philip, Simon, and James.
Behold, the round world, both east and west, rejoices to have you as fathers
and expects you to act as judges.

Translation by Mick Swithinbank