Lord of the Sabbath, hear our vows

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General information

This is an hymn by Philip Doddridge, published 1755, entitled The Eternal Sabbath. This hymn has been amended and augmented many times; in more recent times this hymn is better known as Lord of the Sabbath, hear us pray. See discussion in John Julian's Dictionary of Hymnology, p. 693.

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Text and translations

English.png English text

1. Lord of the Sabbath, hear our vows
On this thy day, in this thy house:
And own, as grateful sacrifice
The songs, which from the desert rise.






2. Thine earthly Sabbaths, Lord, we love,
But there’s a nobler rest above;
To that our laboring souls aspire
With ardent pangs of strong desire.

3. No more fatigue, no more distress;
Nor sin nor hell shall reach the place;
No groans to mingle with the songs
Which warble from immortal tongues.

4. No rude alarms of raging foes;
No cares to break the long repose;
No midnight shade, no clouded sun,
But sacred, high, eternal noon.

5. O long-expected day, begin;
Dawn on these realms of woe and sin;
Fain would we leave this weary road,
And sleep in death to rest with God.

Doddridge, Hymns Founded…, 1755
Enfield 1770 is the same except for
next-to-last line: “With joy we’ll
tread the appointed road,”
Reprinted as above in Jeremy Belknap, 1795

 

1. Lord of the Sabbath, hear our vows,
On this thy day, in this thine house,
And own, as grateful sacrifice
The songs which from: thy temple rise.






2. Thine earthly Sabbaths, Lord, we love,
But there's a nobler rest above;
To that our longing souls aspire,
With cheerful hope, and strong desire.

3. No more fatigue, no more distress,
Nor sin nor death shall reach the place;
No groans shall mingle with the songs,
Which dwell upon immortal tongues.

4. No rude alarms of angry foes;
No cares to break the long repose ;
No midnight shade, no clouded sun,
But sacred, high, eternal noon.

5 O long expected day, begin;
Dawn on these realms of pain and sin;
With joy we'll tread the appointed road,
And sleep in death, to rest with God.

A collection of Psalms proper for
Christian worship, Liverpool, 1791

 

1. Lord of the Sabbath, hear our vows,
On this thy day, in this thy house:
And let our songs and worship rise
Like grateful incense to the skies.






2. Thine earthly Sabbaths, Lord, we love,
But there’s a nobler rest above;
To that our laboring souls aspire
With ardent pangs of strong desire.
















Babcock, Middlesex Harmony, 1803

 

1. Lord of the Sabbath! hear us pray,
In this thy house, on this thy day;
Accept as grateful sacrifice.
The songs which from thy temple rise.

2. Now met to pray, and bless thy name,
Whose mercies flow each day the same,
Whose kind compassions never cease;
We seek instruction, pardon, peace.

3. Thine earthly Sabbaths, Lord! we love ;
But there's a nobler rest above;
O that we might that rest attain
From sin, from sorrow, and from pain!

4. In thy blest kingdom we shall be
From every mortal trouble free ;
No sighs shall mingle with the songs
Resounding from immortal tongues.

5. No rude alarms of raging foes,
No cares to break the long repose,
No midnight shade, no clouded sun,
But sacred, high, eternal noon.

6. O long-expected day, begin!
Dawn on this world of woe and sin :
Fain would we leave this weary road.
To sleep in death, and rest in God.

Cotterill, Selection, 1819
Montgomery, Christian Psalmist, 1825

References

  • Belknap, Jeremy. 1795. Sacred Poetry, Consisting of Psalms and Hymns. Boston: Joseph Belknap. 344 pp.
  • Cotterill, Thomas. 1819. A Selection of Psalms and Hymns for Public and Private Use. Sheffield: J. Blackwell.
  • Doddridge, Philip. 1755. Hymns Founded on Various Texts of the Holy Scriptures. London: Job Orton. 329 pp.
  • Enfield, William. 1770. A Collection of Psalms Proper for Christian Worship. Liverpool: Jay Gore. 201 pp.
  • Montgomery, James. 1825. The Christian Psalmist, or Hymns, Selected and Original. Glasgow: Chalmers and Collins. 444 pp.

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