Hallelujah (Anonymous)

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  • NewScore.gif  (Posted 2019-09-30)   CPDL #55484:         
Editor: Barry Johnston (submitted 2019-09-30).   Score information: 7 x 10 inches (landscape), 1 page, 68 kB   Copyright: Public Domain
Edition notes: FEMALE PILGRIM, transcribed from A Compilation of Genuine Church Music, 1835, and Harmonia Sacra, 1869. Notes in four-shape format, as published in 1835-1869. Words by an unknown author, before 1822, "Whither goest thou, pilgrim stranger," with eight stanzas. Only one stanza included here. MusicXML source file is in compressed .mxl format.
  • NewScore.gif  (Posted 2019-09-30)   CPDL #55483:         
Editor: Barry Johnston (submitted 2019-09-30).   Score information: 7 x 10 inches (landscape), 1 page, 68 kB   Copyright: Public Domain
Edition notes: GOOD SHEPHERD, transcribed from The Christian Lyre, 1830. Words by John Granade, 1804, "Let thy kingdom, blessed Savior," with seven stanzas; only the first stanza here. MusicXML source file is in compressed .mxl format.
Good Shepherd from Hickok's Sacred Harp, 1832
  • NewScore.gif  (Posted 2019-09-30)   CPDL #55482:         
Editor: Barry Johnston (submitted 2019-09-30).   Score information: 7 x 10 inches (landscape), 1 page, 65 kB   Copyright: Public Domain
Edition notes: HALLELUJAH, for two voices (Tenor-Bass). Transcribed from Wyeth's Repository, Part Second (1813). Notes in four-shape format, as published in 1813. One stanza of Robinson's hymn included. MusicXML source file is in compressed .mxl format.
Nettleton from Temple Melodies, 1851
  • CPDL #13508:     
Editor: Noel Stoutenburg (submitted 2007-01-29).   Score information: Letter, 1 page, 16 kB   Copyright: Public Domain
Edition notes: NETTLETON. This is a hymn setting (melody and harmony) only. For a hymn using this tune, see Mighty God while.

General Information

Title: Hallelujah
First Line: Come, thou fount of every blessing
Composer: Anonymous
Lyricist: Robert Robinson

Number of voices: 2vv   Voicing: TB
Genre: SacredHymn tune   Meter: 87. 87. D

Language: English
Instruments: A cappella

First published: 1813 in Wyeth's Repository, Part Second, as HALLELUJAH
  2nd published: 1818 in Kentucky Harmonist, as HALLELUJAH
  3rd published: 1820 in The Missouri Harmony, as HALLELUJAH
  4th published: 1830 in The Christian Lyre, as GOOD SHEPHERD
  5th published: 1832 in The Sacred Harp (John H. Hickok), as GOOD SHEPHERD
  6th published: 1832 in A Compilation of Genuine Church Music, as FEMALE PILGRIM
  7th published: 1851 in Temple Melodies, as NETTLETON

Description: A folk hymn (Jackson 1953a no. 101, Lowens 1964). First published in Wyeth's Repository, Part Second (1813), for two voices., with Robert Robinson's words, "Come thou fount of every blessing." This was reprinted in Metcalf's Kentucky Harmonist (1818) and The Missouri Harmony (1820), both in the same two-part version. It was rearranged by Deodatus Dutton as Good Shepherd in The Christian Lyre, 1830, again for two parts. John H. Hickock in his Sacred Harp (1832) copied Good Shepherd from The Christian Lyre, changing the tune slightly but restoring the original words – the first time the composition begins to look like the hymn tune Nettleton of modern hymn books. The tune was arranged for three parts by Joseph Funk in his Compilation of Genuine Church Music (1832); this has been repeated in many editions of Harmonia Sacra to the present, acquiring an Alto part in 1869.

In four-part two-staff SATB format with European harmony, It acquired the name Nettleton before the 1850s; it appeared in Temple Melodies in 1851 – published by Lowell Mason, Jr., which suggests that Lowell Mason, Sr., may have had a hand in applying the name Nettleton to this tune. (Asahel Nettleton was an influential religious figure and compiler of a popular book of hymns, Village Hymns for Social Worship (1824), but without music.) The tune appeared in The Plymouth Collection (1855) as Bartimeus, with the John Newton words, "Mercy, O thou Son of David." Bliss and Sankey, Gospel Hymns and Sacred Songs [No. 1] (1875) say Nettleton is an "Old Melody, 1812."

Words by Robert Robinson, 1758, amended by Martin Madan, 1760.

External websites:

Original text and translations

Original text and translations may be found at Come, thou fount of every blessing, Mercy, O thou son of David, Let thy kingdom, blessed Savior, and Whither goest thou, pilgrim stranger.